Rainbirds

The next day, I had a high fever and terrible headache as expected, but my sister didn’t return. Mother bought porridge and medicine, but she had to leave at the usual time. “I’m sorry, but I promised my friends I would come over.” She wrote down a phone number on the calendar. “If your fever gets worse and you need me to take you to the hospital, just call Mrs. Koyama and ask for me.” I nodded, knowing I wouldn’t call. She was going for mahjong and they needed four players. They couldn’t continue with one player missing. Just like … Continue reading Rainbirds

Why I have mixed feelings about my birthday: A strange review of Future Home of the Living God

I have been a huge Louise Erdrich fan for years now (you can find one of my reviews here), and when I saw that this book was coming out I was delighted, because I love science fiction and fantasy too, and I never expected her to make such a huge genre leap. Seriously, the conversation in our house went something like this: Me: “Louise Erdrich is putting out a sci-fi book! I have to preorder it so I can read it right away!” Mr. Bookworm: “Christmas is coming up – why don’t you just wait and see if you get it … Continue reading Why I have mixed feelings about my birthday: A strange review of Future Home of the Living God

In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills

Rachel follows him out onto a succession of thin wooden planks, jumping over oozing mud from one section to the next, her heart beating fast as she loses her balance and grabs his hand. Halfway across the boardwalk, Tucker stops abruptly. “Bingo, zebras at ten o’clock,” he whispers, pointing to three large animals and two smaller ones approaching the lake. The family is so close that Rachel hears the hooves sloshing through the mucky grass. She starts to crouch, but there’s nowhere to hide. “Relax,” Tucker says. “They don’t know to be afraid of us. Just keep a polite distance.” … Continue reading In the Shadow of 10,000 Hills

The Girl Who Fell from the Sky

“Hey,” Brick says finally. “What did you wish?” “I can’t tell you,” I say. But I think, If only Robbie had been a bird. If only we had been a family that could fly. – The Girl Who Fell from the Sky by Heidi W. Durrow The Girl Who Fell from the Sky by Heidi W. Durrow The Girl Who Fell from the Sky is a novel about a biracial girl named Rachel, the daughter of a Danish woman and an African American father living in America in the 1970s. At a young age, Rachel’s mother leaped off the roof of a … Continue reading The Girl Who Fell from the Sky

The House at the Edge of Night

Into this disorder, as into a warm sea, stepped Amedeo. He passed through the scents of jasmine and anchovies and liquor, through snatches of dialect and accented Italian and high lamenting songs whose language he did not recognize, through the light of fires and torches and the hundred red candles that illuminated the ghostly saint. At last, emerging from the crowd with his suitcase clutched to his chest, he found himself before an extraordinary house. – The House at the Edge of Night by Catherine Banner The House at the Edge of Night by Catherine Banner The House at the Edge … Continue reading The House at the Edge of Night

La Rose

She knew “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” and yet her mother had taught her to use fierce and subtle Ojibwe poisons. She knew how to catch and skin any animal she saw. Her mother had snared the head of a demon white man and burnt its eyes out. Her mother had called for her mother’s drum and cured a man who wandered in black vertigo. Her mother had made a new drum for her daughter. Nobody took it because she left it with her father. Now this LaRose had seen the ocean. Now her work out east was done. … Continue reading La Rose

The Bone Clocks

She looks at me. “So what must I do to be safe? Stay here forever?” “I think,” I tell her, “you’ll only be safe if we win our War.” “If we don’t win,” says Unalaq, “it’s over for all of us.” Holly Sykes shuts her eyes, giving us one last chance to vanish and to return to her life as it was at Blithewood Cemetery before a slightly chubby African Canadian psychiatrist strolled into view. Ten seconds later, we’re still here. She sighs and tells Unalaq, “Tea, please. Splash of milk, no sugar.” – The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell … Continue reading The Bone Clocks